Laboratory of Myeloid Cell Biology in Tissue Homeostasis and Regeneration

Our research focuses on the development and functional specialization of tissue-resident macrophages. We focus on the interactions between the macrophages and their tissue-specific niche.

Martin Guilliams

Group Leader
VIB Group leader as of July 2017
Professor: Ghent Univ., Ghent, Belgium, 2015-current
Postdoc: Ghent Univ., Ghent, Belgium, 2011-2015
Postdoc: CIML, Marseille, France, 2008-2011
PhD: Free Univ. of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium, 2003-2008

Research areas

Immunology & inflammation Human diseases Computational biology

Model organisms

Research Focus

Our research focuses on the development and functional specialization of tissue-resident macrophages. We focus on the interactions between the macrophages and their tissue-specific niche and study the mutually beneficial cell-cell circuits between these cells. We take a modular view of tissues that integrates the resident macrophage as an essential component of each individual module. We focus most of our work on liver myeloid cells. We are particularly interested in: (i) identifying the transcription factors that imprint the liver-specific identities in each of the liver module partners, (ii) identifying the cell-cell circuits within the liver module and (iii) unraveling the role of each module partner in the maintenance of liver homeostasis and (iv) understanding what cell-cell circuits instruct liver regeneration and the formation of novel liver modules.

We love the liver and study the interaction between hepatic macrophages and their niche.

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Martin Guilliams Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested, please contact us.

Team

The Martin Guilliams Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority.

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.