Functional Phosphoproteomics

Ive De Smet leads the Functional Phosphoproteomics Group. To fully understand plant growth and development, we need to identify novel components and require insight in the underlying network.

Ive De Smet

Group Leader
Group leader at VIB since May 2013
Postdoc: Ghent University/VIB, Belgium, 2010
Postdoc: Center for Plant Molecular Biology/Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany, 2006-2010
PhD: University of Leeds, UK & Ghent University, Belgium, 2006

Research areas

Plant biology Systems biology Structural biology Cell Biology

Research Focus

Ive De Smet leads the Functional Phosphoproteomics Group. To fully understand plant growth and development, we need to identify novel components and require insight in the underlying network. In this context, there is an urgent need to gain insight in protein changes on different levels, including protein-protein interactions and post-translational protein modifications. With respect to the latter, temporary and reversible phosphorylation of proteins is essential in regulating intracellular biological processes. Phosphorylation affects protein folding (conformation), protein function and the regulation of enzymatic activities, defines substrate specificity, and influences protein localization, complex formation and degradation. The mechanistic importance of phosphorylation is obvious from its major influence on various cell functions, such as signal transduction, cell division, cell differentiation, and metabolic maintenance.

As a biological model, the Functional Phosphoprotemics Group focuses on thermomorphogenesis, a process whereby plants respond to mild warm temperature conditions by increased elongation growth of organs to enhance cooling capacity. Although our understanding of temperature perception and response in plants has increased in recent years, we still know relatively little about the cellular signalling cascades that control architectural adaptations to high ambient temperatures.

Arabidopsis thaliana has been proven to be an efficient model plant to study plant growth and development, but time has come to investigate signaling cascades in crop species, such as wheat and soybean, species that are currently also under investigation.

Wheat seedlings

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Ive De Smet Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested, please contact us.

Team

The Ive De Smet Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority.

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.