News

Scientists identify chromosomal instability as a novel predictive biomarker for cancer drug Avastin

10/10/2018

Following a recent publication in the leading cancer  journal Journal of Clinical Oncology RCSI and international collaborators within the ANGIOPREDICT research consortium have now  further revealed chromosomal instability  (where  whole human chromosomes or parts of chromosomes are duplicated or deleted) may predict which patients benefit most from the use of a key drug to treat colorectal cancer (Avastin). By predicting the patients that would not benefit from Avastin, individuals could be spared the side-effects of this particular drug therapy, and are more likely to receive an optimal treatment with a minimum of delay, while reducing cost of care.

Scientists create a complete atlas of lung tumor cells

09/07/2018

Researchers from VIB, Leuven University and University Hospital Leuven studied thousands of healthy and cancerous lung cells to create the first comprehensive atlas of lung tumor cells. Their results reveal that tumors are much more complex than previously appreciated, distinguishing 52 different types of cells. This new information can be used to identify new research lines for treatment. The results of the study will be published in the leading journal Nature Medicine.

VIB pushes the boundaries of science to develop new diagnostic tools

27/07/2017

​Greater knowledge of molecular mechanisms and novel bio-analytical methods lead to more efficient and accurate diagnostics. With their world-leading strengths in molecular research and biotechnology, various VIB labs are paving the way for novel diagnostic tools that will ultimately reduce disease burden and save lives by making disease diagnosis better, faster and more flexible. The proof is in the partnership: three recent collaborations between VIB, university hospitals and diagnostics industry leaders highlight just how critical molecular science at VIB is to the development of cutting-edge diagnostic technology.

VIB groups and big data

21/06/2017

Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Microbiology): “The microbiome field is still in the development phase, so the datasets aren’t as big as they are, for example, in genetics GWAS studies. This being said, in our Flemish Gut Flora Project, there are about 3,500 individuals for which we have microbiome and genetics data, and will be generating metabolomics in the future. In addition to all the clinical and questionnaire data, this is becoming quite an impressive dataset, I’d say – and the multiomics integration won’t be straightforward. Things will become even bigger in the future – for the trials we are currently planning, we will be collecting between 15,000 and 20,000 samples. The biggest challenge there is not the data analysis, but the logistics! ! Yet, it’s still not enough –in our recent Science paper, we estimated that at least 40,000 individuals need to be sampled to have a complete view of gut biodiversity in the healthy population. So, we still have quite some work ahead of us!”