One of our main interests is the development of methods to analyze functional genomics data and integrate them in models that reflect the regulatory wiring and modularity of biological systems, and ultimately predict their behavior. We are also developing user-friendly computational tools to assist wet-lab researchers in the interpretation of large-scale datasets and biological networks.

Steven Maere

Group Leader
VIB Group leader since October 2009
Visiting Postdoc.: Univ. California, Berkeley, USA, 2008-2009
PhD: VIB-Ghent Univ., Ghent, Belgium, 2006

Research areas

Plant biology Computational biology

Model organisms

Research Focus

With the availability of fully sequenced genomes and the development of high-throughput functional genomics technologies, we now have the tools to look at the molecular biology of an organism from a systemic viewpoint. Systems biology is a dynamic and highly interdisciplinary field, requiring input from biology as well as engineering, physics and mathematics. One of our main interests is the development of methods to analyze functional genomics data and integrate them in models that reflect the regulatory wiring and modularity of biological systems, and ultimately predict their behavior. We are also developing user-friendly computational tools to assist wet-lab researchers in the interpretation of large-scale datasets and biological networks.
 

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Maere Lab news

The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super yeasts!

21/10/2019

An international team of scientists, led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof. Steven Maere (VIB-UGent), has discovered that some of the most renowned classic Belgian beers, including Gueuze and Trappist ales, are fermented with a rare and unusual form of hybrid yeasts. These yeasts combine DNA of the traditional ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with that of more stress-resistant feral yeasts such as Saccharomyces kudriavzevii.

Beer yeasts are dogs, wine yeasts are cats

08/09/2016

People have been enjoying the ability of yeasts to produce beer and wine since the dawn of civilization. Researchers from VIB, KU Leuven and Ghent University found that yeasts used for beer and winemaking have been domesticated in the 16th century, around 100 years before the discovery of microbes. Together with a US research team, the Belgian teams analyzed the genomes and fermentation characteristics of more than 150 industrial yeasts used to produce different beers, wines and bread. The results show that the hundreds of beer and wine yeasts available today are the result of brewers and winemakers unconsciously selecting variants that can consume specific sugars, tolerate industrial conditions and produce desired flavors. Fascinatingly, beer yeasts show stronger signs of domestication than wine yeasts, likely because they happily lived in the brewery throughout the year and lost all contact with their feral family members. The results are published in the scientific journal Cell.
 

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Steven Maere Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested, please contact us.

Team

The Steven Maere Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority.

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.