Barriers in inflammation

Tight barriers form the major protection for the brain against external insults such as toxins, infectious agents and peripheral blood fluctuations. These brain barriers are a central part of the brain homeostasis mechanism and assure a balanced and well-controlled micro-environment around synapses and axons in the central nervous system (CNS). 

Roosmarijn Vandenbroucke

Group Leader
VIB Group Leader as of March 2018
Professor at Ghent Univ. since 2015
Postdoc: Ghent Univ., Ghent, Belgium
PhD: Ghent Univ., Ghent, Belgium, 2008

Research areas

Human diseases Immunology & inflammation

Model organisms

Research Focus

Tight barriers form the major protection for the brain against external insults such as toxins, infectious agents and peripheral blood fluctuations. These brain barriers are a central part of the brain homeostasis mechanism and assure a balanced and well-controlled micro-environment around synapses and axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Although largely understudied, the choroid plexus epithelium, forming the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, is an important and unique single layer of epithelial cells situated at the interface between blood and brain. Subtle changes in the choroid plexus epithelial cells, via changes in the CSF composition, have wide-ranging effects on the brain and will subsequently affect disease progression. Therefore, understanding blood-CSF barrier functionality under physiological and pathophysiological conditions might open up new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases. 

Our research focuses on the effect of systemic inflammation (including sepsis/SIRS or other inflammatory stimuli such as (inflamm)aging) and neuroinflammation (such as the age-related diseases Alzheimerʼs and Parkinson's disease) on the blood-CSF barrier.

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Roos Vandenbroucke Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested, please contact us.

Team

The Roos Vandenbroucke Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority.

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.

Vandenbroucke Lab news

geen vertaling beschikbaar Targeting drugs to the brain

24/09/2019

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), neurological disorders, ranging from epilepsy to Alzheimer’s disease, affect up to one billion people worldwide. These neurological disorders affect people in all countries, irrespective of age, sex, education, or income. The impact of these conditions on healthcare systems across the globe is enormous, and with an aging population in many countries this burden is likely to increase. Patients do not only experience difficulties in the practicalities of life, but also in their emotional and psychological experiences.

geen vertaling beschikbaar Counteracting the effects of TNF receptor-1 has therapeutic potential in Alzheimer’s disease

22/02/2018

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and increasing evidence has shown that neuroinflammation is an important and early hallmark of the pathogenesis. It has been suggested that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, might be detrimental in AD, though the results coming from clinical trials on anti-TNF inhibitors are inconclusive. Prof. Roosmarijn Vandenbroucke (VIB-UGent) reports in the authoritative journal EMBO Molecular Medicine that TNF, via activation of its receptor TNFR1, is the main inflammatory upstream mediator of the AD-associated changes at the choroid plexus and that targeting TNF/TNFR1 signaling has therapeutic potential.