Molecular Signal Transduction in Inflammation

The Beyaert group studies the complex role of key signaling molecules in the fine-tuning and self-limiting nature of major signaling pathways that control gene expression in response to inflammatory triggers, further insights of which raises the prospect for better understanding and rational design of therapeutics for several diseases, including autoimmunity, allergy and cancer.

Rudi Beyaert

Deputy Science Director
Associate Department Director since 2009
Full Professor at Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium since 2003
VIB Group leader since 1997
PhD: Univ. of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium, 1992

Research areas

Human diseases Immunology & inflammation Structural biology Systems biology

Research Focus

Dysregulated immune signaling may lead to the development of chronic autoimmune diseases and cancer. The Beyaert group studies the complex role of key signaling molecules in the fine-tuning and self-limiting nature of major signaling pathways that control gene expression in response to inflammatory triggers, further insights of which raises the prospect for better understanding and rational design of therapeutics for several diseases, including autoimmunity, allergy and cancer. The researchers use a variety of omics-based molecular approaches combined with cellular models, mouse gene targeting and mouse models of human disease.

MALT1 signaling in inflammation, immunity and cancer

The paracaspase MALT1 plays a key role in innate and adaptive immunity by mediating NF-κB signaling and modulating the threshold for activation of several immune and non-immune cells in response to a rapidly growing number of stimuli. Dysregulation of MALT1 is associated with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and cancer, indicating the therapeutic potential of MALT1 targeting. We previously discovered that MALT1 not only acts as a scaffold protein but also as a unique protease. We are using an integrated genetic, proteomics and biochemical approach to explore the complex role of MALT1 signaling in T cells and epithelial cells in the context of psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. 

Expression of a pathogenic human CARD14 mutant transgene in keratinocytes is sufficient to drive psoriasis‐like dermatitis in mice, which can be inhibited by treatment with a MALT1 protease inhibitor.

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Rudi Beyaert Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested to work on molecular signaling in inflammation and immunity, please contact us.

Team

The Rudi Beyaert Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority. 

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange. 

Awards

Five-yearly Price of Fundamental Medical Sciences of the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine