Novelty, exploration and curiosity

When humans or animals detect novel stimuli in their environment, they respond with distinct orienting and exploratory behaviors. We study the brain mechanisms that modulate these behaviours and we develop new experimental methods to improve our abilities to measure and manipulate neurons in the brain.

Sebastian Haesler

Science Director
NERF Director since 2015
NERF Principal Investigator since 2012
Postdoc, Harvard University, US, 2007-2012
PhD, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Germany, 2006
MSc, Hohenheim University, Germany, 2001

Research areas

Systems biology Neurobiology

Research

When humans or animals detect novel stimuli in their environment, they respond with distinct orienting and exploratory behaviors. The long-term goal of our lab is to identify the neural circuits underlying novelty, exploration and curiosity.

Detection of stimulus novelty is extremely fast – behavioral novelty responses occur within 100ms after stimulus presentation. To accomplish such rapid detection and motor response, the brain needs to perform a remarkably efficient computation involving a memory-based classification of incoming sensory stimuli.

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Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Sebastian Haesler Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested to work, please contact us.

Team

The Sebastian Haesler Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority.

Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.