Laboratory for Membrane Trafficking

The Laboratory for Membrane Trafficking is focused on understanding the molecular biology of membrane transport in a disease-related context covering Alzheimer’s disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation type II.

Research areas

Human diseases Systems biology Medical biotechnology

Research focus

Our laboratory is focused on understanding the molecular biology of membrane transport in a disease-related context covering Alzheimer’s disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation type II.

Related to Alzheimer’s, APP cleavage by gamma-secretase leads to amyloid beta peptide production, one possible cause of Alzheimer’s symptoms. gamma-secretase is composed of four proteins – presenilin, nicastrin, PEN-2 and APH-1 – which must come together for cleavage activity.

Starting from the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might be slowed by inhibiting g-secretase, we have now identified an endogenous inhibitor that prevents gamma-secretase complex assembly and activity and thus might be targeted for therapy (Spasic et al., 2007). Although all four components are present in the ER, their assembly into functional gamma-secretase is somehow restricted. Assembly begins with the binding of nicastrin to APH-1. This binding is competed early in the secretion pathway by Rer1p, a membrane receptor that retrieves proteins from the Golgi back to the ER. Rer1p binds to nicastrin, thus interfering with nicastrin’s ability to bind APH-1. Decreasing the amount of Rer1p led to an increase in gamma-secretase activity. Exactly what triggers Rer1p to release nicastrin and allow it to bind to APH-1, and subsequently to the other gamma-secretase components, remains to be determined. Preventing this release might provide a means to reduce gamma-secretase activity and thus amyloid plaque formation.

Publications

To showcase the world-class scientific research of the Stein Aerts Lab, you can discover their scientific papers in more detail.

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Jobs

We are always on the lookout for highly motivated colleagues to join our team. If you are interested, please contact us.

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Team

The Wim Annaert Lab can only thrive thanks to the dedication and commitment of its people, no matter what their function or seniority. 

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Events

To stay up to date in rapidly developing fields, scientists regularly interact with (international) colleagues. Conferences and other (scientific) events are an excellent way to facilitate such a continent-spanning knowledge exchange.

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